Riding The Highs of Reagle's "Carousel" Healed My Heart

Amidst tragedy in our world, Reagle Music Theatre of Greater Boston shines with its bright and hopeful production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel.  Under the skillful and innovative direction of Director-Choreographer Rachel Bertone, and a heavenly cast of Boston-favorite performers, Carousel becomes a “can’t be missed” production about missed opportunities, second chances, and the power of love and hope from within the darkness.

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Next Door Theater's "The Light in the Piazza": Not Your Average Euro-Trip

Next Door Theater Company presents its intimate production of The Light in the Piazza, a gorgeous musical about a mother and a daughter's trip to Italy that changes both of their lives. Unfortunately, this production failed to change mine. While some of the cast boasts impressive voices and Music Director Dan Rodriguez creates beautiful and rich music with his six-piece orchestra (including a melodious harp player), the musical does not leave an impression. Director Adam Schuler fills the space with activity through his capable direction, but his actors lack the essence of their characters, supplementing them in voice but not in action. The production showcases a rarely done and exquisite material, but does not present a production worthy of its material.

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"Bonnie and Clyde" Hits Its Mark But Misses the Love

Thrilling performances by Sarah Cowell as Bonnie Parker and Sarajane Morse Mullins as Blanche Barrow kept you riding along from one song to the next, and Sean Crosley delivers impressive vocal range and musicality as Clyde Barrow, but the lack of chemistry between Cowell and Crosley seemed to change the focus and feel for the iconic story and musical.  Bonnie & Clyde felt like a love song to life’s consequences rather than a duet of infamy and excitement.

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Don't You Wait to See Ellis' Fair and Loverly Eliza Doolittle

There are few things as enchanting as rediscovering a once familiar musical through a new perspective.  Jennifer Ellis’ strong-willed Eliza Doolittle is not only a delight to watch, but a masterpiece of style and grace.  The Lyric Stage Company of Boston freshens the story of My Fair Lady into a modern take of capitalism, ambition, and human connection.  Director Scott Edmiston reimagines the world in the 1930s London, complete with top hats and empire waists, breadlines and soulful melodies.  This My Fair Lady feels even more accessible because of the nuanced acting by Ellis and the charming ignorance of Christopher Chew as Henry Higgins.  The sixteen cast members provide gusto and life to the challenging and lengthy musical making this fit perfectly as an intimate chamber musical with all of the excitement and expertise that the Lyric Stage Company of Boston is known throughout the region.  With an emphasis on storytelling this season, The Lyric brings a new story of rags-to-riches and poppy-cock-to-caviar dreams to its stage, but its heightened emphasis on treating people with dignity and finding the human connection that transcends class and economic status are themes worth dancing all night with this talented cast.

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The Company Theatre's "1776" Stamps Bold Historical and Musical Flair

The Company Theatre's "1776" Stamps Bold Historical and Musical Flair

The Company Theatre performs 1776 under the incredible virtuosity of a stacked ensemble of performers. With notable performances by Doug Jabara as the comedic sage Benjamin Franklin, Andrew Giorandio as the passionate aristocrat Edward Rutledge, and Bob DeVivo as the fearless leader John Adams, the Company Theatre's production offers some of the strongest musical theatre work this season, making it a must see production to escape the summer heat.

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Quadruple-Threat Leads “The Lambeth Walk”

Me and My Girl at Reagle Music Theatre of Greater Boston in Waltham is a whimsical look at the by-gone days of lords and ladies, titles and toddies, coats of arms and family crests. Underneath the silliness of the plot, Reagle Music Theatre’s impressive cast finds heart in loyalty, love, and lots of laughter. While the script drags, the leading actors and energetic ensemble keep the show moving at the perfect pace, delighting audiences of all ages for a fun night at the theatre.

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Jack is Back, But Ripped Apart

Jack the Ripper is not a new tale; tracing back to the 19th century, Jack the Ripper has haunted and plagued the media and bedtime stories as an unsolved “murder of the century.” In fact, Jack the Ripper (can he ever be “Just Jack”?) was selected by theBBC History magazine as the worst Briton in history. That’s quite a feat. Why is he the worst? Because he killed no less than eleven women? Because he sexually assaulted his victims? No, but because he is a fear which is spoken but rarely named and never caught. Jack the Ripper represents the unknown, but, more than that, he holds a special place in history because of the many sociopolitical effects of his “Whitecapel murders.” So why the exposition? The F.U.D.G.E Theatre Company premieres Jack the Ripper: The Whitechapel Musical at the Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, book and lyrics by Christopher-Michael DiGrazia and Steven Bergman, and music by Steven Bergman. While the musical dates back to the 1990s, this musical has been revised such that it feels like a new piece. The musical, however, falls into bad habits and, like Jack the Ripper, commits some disturbing murders of otherwise talented performers.

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