2015 Best Supporting Actress in a Play Nominee: Tiffany Nichole Greene as Marc Antony in Bridge Repertory Theater of Boston's "Julius Caesar"

Photo Credit: Eric Richardson

Photo Credit: Eric Richardson

Before we announce our 2015 ArtsImpulse Award Winners, we are proud to present our 2015 ArtsImpulse Nominee Interview Series.

NOTE: If you were nominated for a 2015 ArtsImpulse Theatre Award, and you would like to participate in our 2015 ArtsImpulse Nominee Interview Series, please email us at brian@artsimpulse.com.

Tiffany Nichole Greene rose like a bright star as Marc Antony in an exhilarating production of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar by Bridge Repertory Theater of Boston ("Bridge Rep").  Her Marc Antony was as fierce as ever, but her presence as a formidable leader and her cool calculation made Tiffany's performance even more palpable. In her Interview, Tiffany talks about her performance in Julius Caesar, her acting training, and what she wishes that her family and friends understood about theatre.

Tiffany, thank you so much for joining us for our ArtsImpulse Nominee Interview Series.  Can you start by telling us about yourself?

Hi! I’m an actor and director from Houston, Texas, which is the city that I still call home. I’ve been living in New York City for 4 years now. I have a doggie, Amos, whom I love very much and have had for all 14 years of his life. I love to travel. I travel a lot for work (and so does Amos!). I greatly and equally love Shakespeare and contemporary works the most.

Tell us about your role in Julius Caesar and the overall production.  What was different about it?  With what did you struggle?  What came easy for you?

Well, for one thing, I played a role that I’d guess is rarely played by an African-American female. However, I was greatly encouraged and inspired by the unique twist my casting added to the conflict amongst such powerful male characters. Because Marc Antony is written to be an outsider amongst the Senators, it was pretty easy to allow my race and gender to fully be present in the world without having to manipulate Shakespeare’s language (beyond a few pronouns, of course).

I found myself constantly negotiating the balance of Marc Antony: I wanted to allow her to be fully powerful in her own right while also being careful not to deny the human characteristics of any person dealing with loss, justice, or revenge that may be labeled as “feminine” when seen on a woman. While this required my close attention, it came to be quite natural and fitting.

Marc Antony (Tiffany Nichole Greene*) in Bridge Repertory Theater of Boston's Julius Caesar (Photo Credit: Marc Franklin) (* Denotes a Member of Actors' Equity Association).

Marc Antony (Tiffany Nichole Greene*) in Bridge Repertory Theater of Boston's Julius Caesar (Photo Credit: Marc Franklin) (* Denotes a Member of Actors' Equity Association).

Do you have a favorite Shakespeare play?  Why?  Do you have a least favorite?

My favorite is Macbeth!! And The Winter’s Tale!

My least favorite may have to be . . . I don’t know . . . Comedy of Errors?

Talk to us about your acting training.  How did these program(s) prepare you as a professional?  How did they not prepare you?

I’m an MFA graduate of Brown University/Trinity Rep. Our text work training is pretty amazing, and we are fully encouraged to start character development with what we DO know/identify with in the character. From there, we can extend through imagination and expand into behavior, which encompasses emotion as a component, but it is much more active, realistic, and, ultimately, more 3-dimensional. Because we train under a company of collaborators, I think we tend to go through a bit of shock when we get out into the real world and we are all in competition with one another.

We’re going out to dinner.  Where are we going?  What are we eating?  What would we talk about?

Flying down to Texas for enchiladas wrapped in flour tortillas from Pappasito's Cantina! We’ll chat about . . . Everything! I love a good catch-up session.

What surprises you about theatre?  What inspires you?  What bores you?

Theatre is an intimate, shared experience between audience and actor. Blood, sweat, and tears are literally shed for one another. In both directions. That’s pretty breathtaking.

If you could have any superpower, what would it be, and why?  What would you do with it?  Would you wear a cape?

Definitely the power to teleport!!!! I would work everywhere and all of the time. Since my cape would be glittery gold, I would wear my cape on special occasions. Wouldn’t want to show off too much!

What do you wish that your family and friends understood about your life in theatre? 

I wish my family understood on a truly deeeeeep level that I’m not getting fired. Everyone is being let go. The play is over and there’s no work left to do on the project. And we can still celebrate the achievement even though we can’t hold on to the event itself. And the “down time” not a time of mourning. It’s ok.

Marc Antony (Tiffany Nichole Greene*) and one of the senators (Jacob Athyal) in Bridge Repertory Theater of Boston's Julius Caesar (Photo Credit: Marc Franklin) (* Denotes a Member of Actors' Equity Association).

Marc Antony (Tiffany Nichole Greene*) and one of the senators (Jacob Athyal) in Bridge Repertory Theater of Boston's Julius Caesar (Photo Credit: Marc Franklin) (* Denotes a Member of Actors' Equity Association).

Do you have any upcoming projects?

I just directed a reading for a full-length play in a festival in NYC, called The Fire This Time Festival. I’m also directing two one-acts right now at New Perspectives Theatre Company (NYC). Both will open in late February 2016 and run for a month in repertory. Oh and last, but not least, I'm a 2015-2016 SOHO Rep Lab Director.

NOW FOR THE BOSTON STUFF! I’m directing Bridge Rep’s next show, The Launch Prize, which opens in March 2016; and I’m acting in SpeakEasy Stage Company’s upcoming production of BootyCandy, which also opens in March 2016! Busy, Busy!